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Home Downsizing London Ontario

Downsizing Your Home In or To London Ontario

One Floor Houses For Sale in London Ontario & Area on MLS

The popularity of one-level homes in London Ontario and the area has increased immensely over the past few years as the demographics change, with fewer stairs to manage and, in some cases, less to heat or cool.

Nothing can be more frustrating for a home buyer looking for a bungalow one-floor house or a bungalow and having to search through hundreds of listings to find one.

We have attempted to show bungalows for sale for $600,000 and up; however, we are at the mercy of the data entered into the MLS system, so if you see the odd two-storey house or side or back split,,, don’t shoot the messenger! That’s me!

One Floor Houses in London, St. Thomas, Port Stanley, DelawareStrathroy, Mount Brydges, Lucan, Ilderton, Kilworth, Komoka, Dorchester, Thornbury & Thorndale For Sale on MLS Starting at $600,000

One Floor Condo Townhouses & Townhomes For Sale in London Ontario & Area on MLS

One Floor Townhomes, Townhouses, Vacant Land Bungalow Condos in London, St. Thomas, Port Stanley, Delaware, Strathroy, Mount Brydges, Lucan, Ilderton, Kilworth, Komoka, Dorchester, Thornbury & Thorndale For Sale on MLS Starting at $500,000

What’s involved?

Downsizing to a one-floor house, a one-floor townhome or townhouse, or an apartment condo in London, Ontario requires well-thought-out steps, including financial planning and paring down your possessions. Social and health considerations also play a role. Maintaining and staying in a home that no longer meets your needs and lifestyle can be a financial burden or mobility issue. It prevents you from travelling or doing any number of things you have ever dreamed of doing.

You’ve got this far in your life and have managed to handle the good and the not so good; here are a few ideas that may help.

happy couple downsizing in London Ontario

 Plan a realistic timeframe and your housing needs.

Think about where you want to live, what amenities you require, and who you want to be near. Spend time researching the area and property. Don’t go more significant than you need. In contrast to downsizing too much, you can also not reduce enough. You can imagine the kids and grandkids will visit all you want, but don’t go for a home that’s bigger than you need to accommodate potential visitors. One spare room and a fold-out sofa could probably adapt to most needs and keep your home manageable.

The same goes for lot sizes. Consider how much yard maintenance you will be able to do as you advance in years and the costs if you have to hire someone to mow the grass, weed the garden and shovel snow.

Planning for a quiet life outside the city might make sense on the one hand, but it puts you further from essential services when you’re older and usually further from public transport if you’re unable to drive because of your health. The location considerations you had may not be the same as you get older. Wherever you choose a location, make sure you plan to meet your future needs.

Downsizing can create more time for doing the things we enjoy most. When we consider the amount of time many of us spend cleaning and maintaining our homes, the opportunity to increase our leisure time is very appealing. My clients tell me that they feel more relaxed and free after rightsizing and spend more time with friends and family.

downsizing to a smaller house

 Focus on the positives

Moving to a smaller home may make it easier for you to travel, participate in interests and activities, and enjoy a new sense of freedom. Embrace downsizing as an adventure, an opportunity to meet new people and explore a new phase of your life.

Ask yourself, “Is managing the family home holding [me] back from enjoying life?”

Letting go

Downsizing from a larger house to a one-floor bungalow or apartment is an incredibly emotional experience for most. Although it can be challenging to let go of the many prized possessions we accumulate over time, it can be difficult to clear our closets, drawers, and basements of things we no longer need or use. One bonus: it’s easier to find what we’re looking for!

“When you have loads of closets and storage, you tend to fill all that space,” says professional organizer Rowena List. A smaller space allows for a specific place for necessary things.

Becoming more social

Downsizing can create more time for doing the things we enjoy most. When we consider the amount of time many of us spend cleaning and maintaining our homes, the opportunity to increase our leisure time is very appealing. My clients tell me that after downsizing their homes, they feel more relaxed and free, able to spend more time with friends and family.

Renewing our attitude

Downsizing can provide the chance to renew our perspective on life. Integrative physician Isaac Eliaz states, “Such life circumstances offer a great example of the holistic nature of detoxification, creating new space for transformation. We can access hidden gems: renewed feelings of excitement, freshness, and inspiration.”

Challenges

Where to move can be difficult when we factor in all the things we want, such as proximity to transportation, shopping, and medical facilities. Moving can also impact our family and social life.

Sense of loss

When we move from a long-term family home, we may feel a sense of loss for the family connections and lifestyle it represents. Allow family members to help you with your move to help ease the transition to a new home.

Less space

A smaller living space can present challenges when hosting family dinners or preventing grown children from returning home, given to a more spacious house. Downsizing may encourage our grown children to step up to the plate by taking over family dinners and making their way in life.

Like any change, downsizing takes adjusting. Any significant life change naturally creates stress. Although it is a “highly emotional and stressful” time, downsizing can be a positive life transition with careful planning.

Downsizing dos

These steps will help you make a smooth transition to a smaller residence.

Plan a realistic timeframe.

Take your time, and work with a professional organizer if the process is too overwhelming. Take small steps. Give yourself plenty of time, but stick to a firm deadline, advises List.

Determine your housing needs.

Think about where you want to live, what amenities you require, and who you want to be near. Spend time researching the area and property.

Stay within your budget.

Make sure your ideal home matches your current [and future] budget while having a vision of the lifestyle you want to keep.  

With income reduced to your pension and other investments, you may have to adjust to a more modest lifestyle. A smaller home will cost you less, but there may be other costs you need to factor in. Are you overestimating the worth of the home you’re selling? What will the sale price buy you for a retirement home? Get a complete list of what you need to consider, and weigh it up against your income to get a balance that you’ll be happy with.

Do your homework.

If purchasing a condo, research the condo fees, building condition, management reputation or turnover, and décor and pet restrictions. An essential consideration is the mix of owner-occupied vs tenant rentals and the age group of the other owners in the complex or building.

Create a good support network.

For a smooth transition, obtain input from family and significant others, property appraisers, and real estate agents. You may also wish to consult financial advisors, planners, accountants, and lawyers.

Sort through personal papers and photographs first.

These items take the most time to look over. Decide whether to keep them, save them for your children, or shred them.

Ask family members for help sorting through other possessions.

Downsizing is a huge undertaking. An unbiased opinion is always welcome when we decide what we want to keep and what we can donate, recycle, or sell. Don’t simply toss old items away. If in doubt about the value of an item, have it appraised.

Focus on the positives.

Moving to a smaller home may make it easier for you to travel, participate in interests and activities, and enjoy a new sense of freedom. Embrace downsizing as an adventure, an opportunity to meet new people and explore a new phase of your life.

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